Strategy+Culture: A New LinkedIn Group

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About two months or so ago I started a LinkedIn Group, Strategy+Culture.  This is a fully managed group, with an independent manager to facilitate discussions and help keep the topics on track.  Currently we have over 1,000 members and the debate and discussion has been lively and interesting.

I have long seen an intimate and self-reinforcing relationship between Strategy and Culture, but like most topics in the business world, they are often treated independently and even seen as very separate issues.  Classical business thinking looks at strategy as the analytical, data-driven, marketplace focused studies and plans to beating the competition and gaining competitive advantage.

Culture, on the other hand, has been for many years treated as a “second-class” citizen in the business world.  Criticized as too soft, too subjective and impossible to measure or manage, it is often talked about, but poorly understood.  While the term “Corporate Culture” burst on the business scene over 30 years ago with the 1982 publication of In Search of Excellence by Tom Peters and Bob Waterman and is now a common place topic in executive boardrooms, it is still seen as mostly an isolated component of business, much like a line item on a balance sheet.

(for a more modern view on the relationship between strategy, culture and leadership, see FASTBREAK: The CEO’s Guide to Strategy Execution).

culture eatsOur group, however, is composed of some very experienced executives and professionals around the globe who all have a deep understanding of the connection between Strategy and Culture and the ways in which they impact each other and business performance.  If you believe, like most of us, that the popular term: “Culture eats Strategy for lunch” is just too simplistic, then I encourage you to join in the discussion on Strategy+Culture.  We are looking for insights and examples that we can all learn from in order to be more effective in our roles of executive leadership and professional consulting.

Our first topic really got the ball rolling with over 160 separate comments to the question: “What are your top reasons why companies fail to successfully execute their strategies?”  (http://linkd.in/W7sWYa)

Our second group discussion is now underway as well:  What is the best way to communicate the strategy down to every level of the organization in order to gain focus, buy in and understanding?

So, if you are a business professional with an interest in how Strategy+Culture are interconnected and how they impact business performance, then I encourage you to contact Julie and register you interest in joining this group.  Then join the conversations, read the postings and gain some useful insights in business effectiveness. You will also find numerous relevant articles posted by our members on current research into both strategy and culture.

Also, please pass this posting along to others who may have an interest in this group and its topics.

Tight Lines . . .

John R Childress

john@johnrchildress.com

About johnrchildress

John Childress is currently Visiting Professor in Strategy and Culture at IE Business School in Madrid and a pioneer in the field of strategy execution, culture change, executive leadership and organization effectiveness, author of several books and numerous articles on leadership, an effective public speaker and workshop facilitator for Boards and senior executive teams. In 1978 John co-founded The Senn-Delaney Leadership Consulting Group, the first international consulting firm to focus exclusively on culture change, leadership development and senior team alignment. Between 1978 and 2000 he served as its President and CEO and guided the international expansion of the company. His work with senior leadership teams has included companies in crisis (GPU Nuclear – owner of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plants following the accident), deregulated industries (natural gas pipelines, telecommunications and the breakup of The Bell Telephone Companies), mergers and acquisitions and classic business turnaround scenarios with global organizations from the Fortune 500 and FTSE 250 ranks. He has designed and conducted consulting engagements in the US, UK, Europe, Middle East, Africa, China and Asia. Currently John is an independent advisor to CEO’s, Boards, management teams and organisations on strategy execution, corporate culture, leadership team effectiveness, business performance and executive development. John was born in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and eventually moved to Carmel Highlands, California during most of his business career. John is a Phi Beta Kappa scholar with a BA degree (Magna cum Laude) from the University of California, a Masters Degree from Harvard University and was a PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii before deciding on a career as a business entrepreneur in the mid-70s. In 1968-69 he attended the American University of Beirut and it was there that his interest in cultures, leadership and group dynamics began to take shape. John Childress resides in London and the south of France with his family and is an avid flyfisherman, with recent trips to Alaska, the Amazon River, Tierra del Fuego, and Kamchatka in the far east of Russia. He is a trustee for Young Virtuosi, a foundation to support talented young musicians. You can reach John at john@johnrchildress.com or john.childress@theprincipiagroup.com
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3 Responses to Strategy+Culture: A New LinkedIn Group

  1. Frank Tempesta says:

    John,

    I’ve read through all the comments of your new Strategy+Culture group……very impressive quantity and quality of participants…..Bravo.

    Frank

    Sent from my iPad

    Like

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