The Author’s Essential Toolkit . . .

Last week I attended an invitation only conference for authors of published business books.  Over the course of my 30+ years as a global management consultant, CEO and author, I, like many of you, have attended my fair share of conferences.  While I have always been able to find one or two valuable nuggets of information or insight, the majority of the one or two days was a waste of time.  You can tell the level of engagement of the audience by the number of heads bent down as participants read and write emails throughout most of the conference.

wpid-boring-conference-580x200

My other pet gripe about attending conferences is that more often than not a large percentage of the audience is composed of consultants looking for work!  And they can be pretty obnoxious, telling you all about their wonderful consulting process and pumping you for leads and introductions.  Most conferences I leave early.

soundviewThis conference was unusual and refreshing since the audience was hand selected by the organisers, Soundview, and conducted in “Oprah” style, with the host, David Nour, interviewing key experts (business authors, publishers and book agents) on the key elements in the business author’s toolkit.  And the majority of the time was devoted to audience questions and open discussions among the 60 or so participants.  A nice size group and a good format.

A Key Lever: A Good PR Agent

While every author is searching for their “Muse” of inspiration, another key ingredient in the business author’s toolkit is a PR agent who is not only experienced, but really believes in the author and their work.  Trying to get PR using the “do it yourself” approach is a design to fail.  For some very good reasons:

  • Most authors don’t have a “PR personality”; that is being comfortable and skilled at selling ideas over the telephone.  Their preferred medium is the keyboard, and getting past the clutter and deluge of requests that fill the in boxes of most journalists and book reviewers takes a more personal, and persuasive approach.
  • PR takes time and persistence.  Most authors would rather be writing than “dialling for publicity”.
  • Believe it or not, most journalists would prefer to be contacted by a professional PR person and NOT the author.  More professional and efficient.

Of course, a PR professional comes at a  cost and the bigger the agency, the more the cost seems to be.  I like to think of this as an investment and it is critical to find a person you like working with, who really gets excited about your books, and of course, whose fee structure you can afford. Book PR is a long game, so don’t expect immediate payback.

I am fortunate to have found an excellent, efficient and personable independent PR agent to help get the word out about my business books and my thriller novels. Her name is Melissa Tricoire, she speaks English and French fluently, is an Oxford graduate. She is personable and tenacious.  And we work well together.  In fact, she is the one responsible for the recent review in The Economist of my latest book, LEVERAGE: The CEO’s Guide to Corporate Culture.  You can contact her at melissatricoirepr@gmail.com if you, like me, want to take advantage of PR for  your book project.

John R Childress

Author of LEVERAGE: The CEO’s Guide to Corporate Culture, and FASTBREAK: The CEO’s Guide to Strategy Execution, available from Amazon in paperback and eBook formats.

About johnrchildress

John Childress is currently Visiting Professor in Strategy and Culture at IE Business School in Madrid and a pioneer in the field of strategy execution, culture change, executive leadership and organization effectiveness, author of several books and numerous articles on leadership, an effective public speaker and workshop facilitator for Boards and senior executive teams. In 1978 John co-founded The Senn-Delaney Leadership Consulting Group, the first international consulting firm to focus exclusively on culture change, leadership development and senior team alignment. Between 1978 and 2000 he served as its President and CEO and guided the international expansion of the company. His work with senior leadership teams has included companies in crisis (GPU Nuclear – owner of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plants following the accident), deregulated industries (natural gas pipelines, telecommunications and the breakup of The Bell Telephone Companies), mergers and acquisitions and classic business turnaround scenarios with global organizations from the Fortune 500 and FTSE 250 ranks. He has designed and conducted consulting engagements in the US, UK, Europe, Middle East, Africa, China and Asia. Currently John is an independent advisor to CEO’s, Boards, management teams and organisations on strategy execution, corporate culture, leadership team effectiveness, business performance and executive development. John was born in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and eventually moved to Carmel Highlands, California during most of his business career. John is a Phi Beta Kappa scholar with a BA degree (Magna cum Laude) from the University of California, a Masters Degree from Harvard University and was a PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii before deciding on a career as a business entrepreneur in the mid-70s. In 1968-69 he attended the American University of Beirut and it was there that his interest in cultures, leadership and group dynamics began to take shape. John Childress resides in London and the south of France with his family and is an avid flyfisherman, with recent trips to Alaska, the Amazon River, Tierra del Fuego, and Kamchatka in the far east of Russia. He is a trustee for Young Virtuosi, a foundation to support talented young musicians. You can reach John at john@johnrchildress.com or john.childress@theprincipiagroup.com
This entry was posted in consulting, corporate culture, John R Childress, leadership, Life Skills, Organization Behavior, Self-improvement, strategy execution and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s